Wednesday 7 December 2022
12:00 AM |
NAMME

NAMME

Ali’s family has inherited a mission – taking care of a local healing water and curing sick fellow villagers with it. Three sons are skeptical and only the young daughter Namme stays as the guardian of family traditions.

Runtime
91
Production Year
2017
Film Type
Feature
Production Countries
  • Georgia
  • Lithuania
Casts
Aleko Abashidze, Mariska Diasamidze
Production Company
Georgian National Film Centre
Festivals / Awards
  • 2017: Tokyo International Film Festival, Best Film, Nominee, Japan
  • 2017: Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival, Grand Prize, Nominee, Estonia
  • 2019: Palm Springs International Film Festival, Best Foreign Language Film, Nominee, USA
  • 2019: American Society of Cinematographers, Winner, USA

Crew List

Director
Zaza Khalvashi
Screenwriter
Zaza Khalvashi
DOP / Camera
Giorgi Shvelidze
Editor
Levan Kukhashvili
Sound
Vano Gvaradze, Jonas Maksvytis
Production Designer
Akaki Jashi
Producer
Sulkhan Turmanidze, Ieva Norviliene

Director/s

Zaza Khalvashi
Zaza Khalvashi
Profile

Photos

Film Critic

Gaurdian’s outburstfamily tradition

Mina Akbari
MIna Akbari

Namme is a female narrative without issuing a manifesto from solitary and isolation in a patriarchal world in a Georgian village. The screenplay is based on national legends and stories which shows us a mystic experience of slow cinema. Ali’s family has inherited a mission – taking care of a local healing water and curing sick fellow villagers with it. Three sons are skeptical and only the young daughter Namme stays as the guardian of family traditions. In parallel, a hydro power station is being constructed locally and environmental changes are at stakes. One day the spring water starts to disappear and the only fish in the spring becomes sick. Her aging father remembers the old tradition: the water will not return unless sacrifice is made. Namme isn’t allowed to have love affairs, because she loses her power so does the spring water. However, she falls in love and her power gradually fades away, and she slowly becomes unable to cure people. She faces the dilemma to choose between a private life or sacrifice for family traditions to help people. She finally decides to let the fish go.


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