Lastest Survivor / Homa Tavasoli’s Review of “AGA”

Lastest Survivor / Homa Tavasoli’s Review of “AGA”

When I was child there was a documentary about Eskimos in children shows especially in winter. I remember how excited I ever watched ice jackets, shaving wooden glasses or deer soup orders and unconsciously I was delighted with discovering the strange differences I felt with them. “AGA” revived this excitement.

The film is about the latest survivor of the Eskimos. An old man and woman who are not dependent but they are faithful to nature and the “traditional” and wild life. Eskimos are all gone, seeing the polar reindeer looks like an illusion, and wounds are deadly on the lives of the last animals and, of course, the remaining human beings. In this growing anxiety, Nanuk and his wife try hard to not give up. . A large part of the feature film is minimalist and fanatical about the details of breaking the thick ice of the sea, making a trap for hunting, making ready the frozen fish for dinner, cure the wound of a tired dog It seems that, after a lifetime, walking in the snow, now it’s hard to come down with the only task that pulls out empty boots.

In addition, the AGA is a beautiful film. In the middle of showing these details the beautiful long shots of the film it’s truly screen the loneliness of the only people remain in this nature. In this sadness that everything is inevitable on the path to destruction, the story of this parent who waits for their daughter like Godo  id the narration of this film.

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