The Gnostic and His Deer \ Amir Pourya Review of “AGA”

The Gnostic and His Deer \ Amir Pourya Review of “AGA”

It’s hard to imagine, and its realization is pleasant; that filmmaker can take advantage of a screen with specific visual features, and not only do not restrict it to illustration in its entire world of film. In the most films like AGA the prevailing environment in the narrative creates extreme exoticism in the film, and goes away from the emotional bond between the film and the audience. The “AGA” passes through the North Pole and has named its hero by referring to one of the most famous classic documantry, the “North Nanoc” Robert Flaherty, but it’s not limited to the display of the everyday life of a polarizer and his wife. The old age of a woman and a man is the creator of relationships that the viewer sees and the central position close to the melodrama and the main plot point is their daughter Aga who left them and living in a pole, all of these points make suspense for audience and motivate them to follow narration.

The history of men close to nature in films is a familiarity story, perhaps inevitably reminds any cinema viewers an old lovely man in Dersu Uzala directed by Akira Kurosawa. Kurosava by finding Maxim Monzoke to playing the role based his work on his face, a figure that at the same time could be “observer of nature” and a part of nature. From the Indian to Oriental roots, these kinds of mystical knowledge, due to the proximity to nature have an old story, Dersu Uzala of 1970s or Aga are affected by this legacy. . In Aga, the face and the look and lines of the actor of the role of Nanok, Mikhail Oprosimov, have the same characteristics. His simple mysticism with the stories of his polar deer is written in his face.

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